If You Print It, They Will Come

March 14, 2014

Sure, you’ve got a closet full of race shirts. But how many of you have a shirt from a race that doesn’t exist?

The imaginary race has theme music too. But you have to imagine your own lyrics:


Garmin Forerunner 610 Charging Cradle Fix

November 18, 2013

Garmin Forerunner 610 charging cradleThe Garmin Forerunner 610 is my fourth Garmin GPS watch. Each upgrade has brought new features in a smaller package. But the one thing they haven’t been able to fix is the charger. Luckily, there’s a minor adjustment you can make to the 610 charging cradle that will help.

At one time or another, every Garmin GPS owner has gone to take their watch out of the charging cradle for a run, only to find it sitting there, screen blank, battery dead. It’s not an uncommon occurrence with a new watch. Then, as time passes, Dead Watch Syndrome occurs more frequently.  

It’s important to keep the contacts clean, of course.  Those tiny contacts get sweaty and dirty, so cotton swabs and a little rubbing alcohol can help. But soon enough, even rubber bands and clothespins aren’t enough to ensure a reliable connection between the watch and its cradle.

I found that I could improve the contact between the Garmin 610 and it’s charger by shaving a little bit from the top of the plastic lugs that surround the charging pins on the cradle.  I used my Dremel and a grinder bit, but you could try a file or a sharp knife.  Just a little bit off the top is enough. Don’t take off too much, as the lugs are necessary to keep the charging pins lined up with the contacts on the watch. (Don’t worry, if you screw up, you can buy a replacement cradle).

It’s not a perfect solution, but it helps.


Happiness is…

February 5, 2013
Dreaming of Happiness t-shirt

It’s on Zazzle


Link Farm: May 31 – Bag Tag edition

May 31, 2012

Ruth and I got these race number tags from Bright Running.  There’s no need to send them your actual number.  Just  scan it, send them the image file, and they’ll clean up the image, fix the colors, and print it on a sturdy tag.  I asked them to put our name and address on the back so we could use them as luggage tags and that was no problem.  And they followed up to check if the tags were delivered, so when the  Post Office lost the first set, I didn’t have to nag them to send another – AJ sent them to me via Express Mail.

Just how accurate is your GPS?  Hint: if you wear one while you run the Boston Marathon course, and the GPS says you ran 27.2 miles, don’t complain to the race director.

Here’s a bucket list race: The Everest Trail Race is a six-day stage race with runs ranging from 20 to 31 km (sherpa not included).

Meanwhile, in England they’re holding a race where entrants have no idea how far they have to go to finish.  Their web site says, “Thoughts about the finish line motivate runners all over the world… Just thinking about that definite end point in the long and hard personal battle is what motivates us to get there in the first place and brings comfort to us during the race… Now imagine that this comfort was taken away. Imagine that you are tired, cold, aching, hungry, lonely and depressed and on top of all that you have NO IDEA how much further it is to go.”


The Runner’s Closet

May 19, 2012

If you spend much time running, you accumulate a lot of race shirts and other ephemera. Some runners make quilts, but I stitched together this video.  How many do you recognize?


Barefoot Boys

May 7, 2012

Looking back though old running magazines helps me see how things have changed, but a big part of the fun of  is seeing how some things keep coming back.  Barefoot running, for instance:

Barefoot running works, at least for some people.  But pacing yourself properly is more important than your footwear, or lack thereof.  Just ask Ian Miller: 

Hyde  is now Saucony, as the company was renamed after their popular running shoe brand in 1998.  They were just purchased by Wolverine, the latest of a long string of owners for the brand.

(LDL, Aug. 1961, May 1964)


The Wonder Shoe! 1964 version

April 24, 2012

These days, the exact same shoe would be advertised as a “minimalist” shoe that “shortens your stride”.

My uncle remembers running in these.  He says, “It was a terrible shoe with a ripple sole, but better than a sneaker.”

$13.95 in 1964 is $101.88 today.  A typical Thom McAn shoe in 1964 might have cost $9.95.

(Long Distance Log, May 1964)

And tonight, don’t forget:


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